Faulty Chinese Products

Mark Lanier Providing Commentary and Legal Analysis For News Media Covering Faulty Chinese Products

News about Faulty Chinese Products:

Read about the Mattel Toy Recall

July 10, 2007 – Members of the international press and public are taking note of the safety concerns related to Chinese-manufactured products, and Houston attorney Mark Lanier says these defective products are creating legal issues for U.S. businesses and consumers alike.

Mr. Lanier, founder of The Lanier Law Firm, recently reached a settlement in a case involving defective toys imported from China. This first-hand experience, coupled with his reputation as one of the country’s top litigators, provides Mr. Lanier with valuable insights into the extent of the problem as well as the possible fallout for manufacturers.

In the July 2, 2007, issue of The National Law Journal, Mr. Lanier discusses the probability of additional litigation involving Chinese manufacturers.

“There is a lag time between initial awareness and responsible action, and that lag time we’ll definitely see,” Mr. Lanier says. “Whether it will be long or short, that depends in part whether lawyers are doing their work and businesses are doing their work.”

Mr. Lanier has appeared in several additional media outlets to discuss the legal ramifications of faulty Chinese products, including the “Power Lunch” program broadcast nationally on the cable business network CNBC.

In recent months, numerous reports have surfaced identifying several potentially dangerous Chinese products, including tainted pet food, contaminated fish and faulty tires. The news has caught the attention of the U.S. regulators and members of Congress. On July 18, the Senate Commerce Committee’s Subcommittee on Interstate Commerce, Trade and Tourism will begin hearings on the safety of Chinese-manufactured goods.

In early July, the Consumer Product Safety Commission recalled several Chinese-made products, including jewelry that could cause lead poisoning, as well as a magnetic building set and plastic toy castles with small parts that could choke children.

The number of Chinese imports to the U.S. has steadily increased. This year, they have accounted for more than 60 percent of all recalled issued by the CPSC, including all 24 recalls of toy products.

If you feel that you have been harmed by a defective or poorly designed Chinese-made product or would like more information, please contact The Lanier Law Firm at 713-659-5200.