Mark Lanier Makes the Cover of Texas Super Lawyers Magazine

HOUSTONThe firm’s Mark Lanier is featured as the cover subject of this year’s Texas Super Lawyers magazine, and the accompanying three-page profile highlights the lifestyle, interests and talents of one of the nation’s most successful and acclaimed trial attorneys.

Entitled “Being Mark Lanier,” the article covers the frenetic, cross-country pace that Mr. Lanier maintains on a regular basis, and his drive to become better in every aspect of his life, even the seemingly mundane task of drawing stick figures. Often using hand drawn illustrations before juries, the article notes that perfecting his stick figures is a way for him to up his already impressive game in the courtroom.

“I’m trying to learn how to draw not in the sense of Picasso or Rembrandt, but in a sense of, how do I get really good at Pictionary,” Mr. Lanier says.

This drive to connect with juries has led Mr. Lanier to becoming a master at the use of technology, combining his well-documented PowerPoint skills with real time illustrations using an ELMO document camera. Together with these tools he uses “his talents as a master storyteller who can weave together scientific data and witness testimony with biblical references.”

While enjoying the recent success of a nearly $4.7 billion verdict in St. Louis against Johnson & Johnson based on claims of asbestos in talcum powder causing ovarian cancer, Mr. Lanier and the firm are now focused on representing governmental entities, health care providers and insurance companies  in litigation against opioid manufacturers. In the article he describes the social need and social responsibility of having a lead role in attempting to find a legal resolution in the wake of a nationwide epidemic. But as in any other case, Mr. Lanier views the opioid litigation as a way of doing good for the broadest possible number of people.

“My life is happiest and best when I’m doing the things I’m supposed to be doing,” he concludes. “There’s a great satisfaction from doing what you’re made to do.”

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